What We’re Reading This Week In Our Homeschool!

We try to go to the library weekly and while some times we pick out pretty good books, we’ve had our share of not so great reads as well. However, that’s to be expected from time to time and the plus side is we haven’t actually purchased the book.


Here is a list of our most recent Library Book finds that we simply loved!

What a Naughty Bird

In this hilarious rhyming story, one naughty bird flies around the world, pooping on other animals! He goes on a bull on a farm, an elephant in Africa, a wolf in the mountains, and a shark in the sea. It’s all fun and games until the bird goes a step too far and poops on a bear. The bird forgot that bears can climb trees, too, as the bear climbs up when the bird is sleeping to a higher branch and returns the favor!

This Is Not My Hat

When a tiny fish shoots into view wearing a round blue topper (which happens to fit him perfectly), trouble could be following close behind. So it’s a good thing that enormous fish won’t wake up. And even if he does, it’s not like he’ll ever know what happened. . . . Visual humor swims to the fore as the best-selling Jon Klassen follows his breakout debut with another deadpan-funny tale

We Found A Hat

Two turtles have found a hat. The hat looks good on both of them. But there are two turtles. And there is only one hat. . . . Evoking hilarity and sympathy, the shifting eyes tell the tale in this brilliantly paced story in three parts, highlighting Jon Klassen’s visual comedy and deceptive simplicity. The delicious buildup takes an unexpected turn that is sure to please loyal fans and newcomers alike.

A Grand Old Tree

Once there was a grand old tree, whose roots sank deep into the earth and whose arms reached high into the sky. Every spring the grand old tree flowered and bore cherries for the squirrels and birds that made their homes in her leafy branches. And every year, seeds from the tree scattered in the wind, along with many millions of leaves. Mary Newell DePalma creates an emotional tale of life and renewal, of nature’s bounty and quiet balance, illustrated with simple images made powerful with vivid colors and moving compositions.

Max at Night

Max is done being brave, and now it’s time to sleep―all he has to do is say good night. But something’s wrong! When Max goes to say good night to the moon, it’s nowhere to be found. Unable to sleep without finishing his nighttime ritual, Max embarks on a journey to find the moon and wish it a good night.

You Are Not A Cat

This clever and hilarious story stars Cat, who starts out perfectly content and relaxed, and Duck, who infuriates him by meowing like a cat instead of quacking like Cat thinks he should. Written completely in dialogue, this minimalist text by award-winning novelist Sharon G. Flake (in her debut picture book) is fun to read aloud and easy enough for newly independent readers to enjoy on their own. Anna Raff’s humorous and deceptively simple artwork highlights the characters’ personalities, showing Duck’s quirkiness and good humor and Cat’s rising frustration as Duck impersonates a variety of animals, refusing to concede that he is, indeed, a duck. Duck’s silliness will appeal to children who enjoy pretend play, and older siblings will relate to Cat’s annoyance as Duck refuses to leave his side. This concise, funny story is ideal for multiple readings, with playful details in the artwork and humor that never fades.

Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons

Pete the Cat is wearing his favorite shirt—the one with the four totally groovy buttons. But when one falls off, does Pete cry? Goodness, no! He just keeps on singing his song—after all, what could be groovier than three groovy buttons? Count down with Pete in this rocking new story from the creators of the bestselling Pete the Cat books.

The Little House

Virginia Lee Burton won the Caldecott Medal in 1943 for her memorable picture book The Little House, a poignant story of a cute country cottage that becomes engulfed by the city that grows up around it. The house has an expressive face of windows and doors, and even the feelings of a person, so she’s sad when she’s surrounded by the dirty, noisy city’s hustle and bustle: “She missed the field of daisies / and the apple trees dancing in the moonlight.” Fortunately, there’s a happy ending, as the house is taken back to the country where she belongs. A classic!

Spiders

For the first to third grade set, spiders are fascinating and suitably gruesome, especially when looked at in EXTREME close-up. Amazing images show the beauty and otherworldliness of spiders. Simple, engaging text conveys basic information about spiders as well as cool and quirky facts. One stop-action montage shows a spider leaping twenty times its body length!

Songbirds

This new series is based on the Peterson Identification System, which uses life-like illustrations to help young naturalists make accurate identifications. The design of each book is straightforward, simple, friendly, and easy to use — ensuring the success of beginners. Each of the four new titles in the series (SONGBIRDS, WILDFLOWERS, CATERPILLARS, and BUTTERFLIES) features vibrant color photographs of North American plants, birds, and insects in their natural habitats.

Samantha

Samantha has been blogging for over 8 years and is a wife and homeschool mom of 4 from North Carolina.

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